Doctrine Is Inevitable

I’m old enough to remember a movement in the mid to late 2000s called “the emerging church.” I still own some of their books, because as a high school/college student raised in conservative evangelicalism, I resonated with a lot of what they taught, including the idea that conservative evangelical culture was far too obsessed with policing doctrine. I loved this point, because (at the time) it expressed a coldness I had felt for a long time growing up in the church. Emerging church literature pressed a dichotomy between relationships and religious dogma and laid the blame for the schism at the feet of fundamentalists. “Yes,” I thought, “this is why church feels so inauthentic.”

Many of these authors were explicit in their recommendations. Do away with “what we believe” lists. Stop making theology the test of church membership or teaching. For every verse you read from Paul, read the Sermon the Mount 10 times. If given the choice between insisting on a point of doctrine and welcoming someone into your fellowship, choose the latter every time. It was alluring stuff, because you could hug it, shake its hand, take it out to coffee, not just read or recite it. And it won over a lot of my generation.

I’m no longer allured by it all. For one thing, what we referred to as the “emerging church” doesn’t really exist anymore, and the cause of death is unflattering. Rob Bell went from pastoring to touring with Deepak Chopra. Velvet Elvis (his first and most broadly successful book) was wrongheaded in a lot of ways, but at least it was a book about Christianity and didn’t sound like it should be featured in a Readers Digest column by Gwyneth Paltrow. Don Miler’s Blue Like Jazz was a sort of “searching for answers my religious upbringing didn’t give me” manifesto. Miller now runs a corporate branding company and doesn’t go to church. Well then.

But here’s the most illuminating part. Many of the writers and spokespeople who talked about prioritizing relationships over doctrine have actually become quite adamant about their own theology. It just so happens that the doctrine that is worth making standards around is just a different kind. For example, opposing the death penalty is worth excommunication:

And the ordination of female elders is worth schism (and, presumably, excommunication as well):

The time has come for a schism regarding the issue of women in the church. Those of us who know that women should be accorded full participation in every aspect of church life need to visibly and forcefully separate ourselves from those who do not. Their subjugation of women is anti-Christian, and it should be tolerated no longer.

Christianity’s treatment of LGBT people, too, is worth taking a stand on:

Death penalty, gender, ordination, sexuality: Aren’t these issues that alienate people? Aren’t these divisive topics that keep people at arms length from each other instead of bringing them together around Jesus?

By the standard that was applied ten years ago to conservatives, yes, they are. But it turns out that not all orthodoxies need be “generous.” Not all gatekeepers are bad. It’s a matter of having the right ones.

On that, I certainly agree.


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6 thoughts on “Doctrine Is Inevitable

  1. Thanks for the post! One suggestion for an edit. I think you mean, rather than “opposing the death penalty is worth excommunication”, instead, “supporting the death penalty is worth excommunication.”

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  2. Pingback: My reading list for August 5-11, 2018 | Clay on the Wheel

  3. Your statement “Not all gatekeepers are bad. It’s a matter of having the right ones.” I, too, agree on this point. And I believe and write about the Bible and Spirit of YHVH being the right source of right gatekeepers. It’s all about having the right rebirth into the Kingdom of YHVH. I don’t know how you feel about the Trinity doctrine, but that doctrine is what prevents believers of Jesus Christ from having the right rebirth and shuts them out of the Kingdom of YHVH.

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    1. Bryce William Rogers

      Mary Lewis,

      What do you mean? Why do you bring in the trinity on this post? What book, chapter and verse supports your position (for which I am also, and initially asking for further explanation)?

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      1. Bryce William Rogers,
        As Christians we are supposed to protect the truth of the Bible. Unfortunately, that isn’t being done. My position is stated in all of my books, which are about the Bible and what we are supposed to protect. You can look inside all of them. I provide all the information you are looking for in them. amzon.com/author/mary_e_lewis.

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